Laws For Lead Paint | Home Lead Paint Laws | Home Safety

lead paint

 

If you are renovating, repairing, or painting a home constructed prior to 1978, federal lead paint laws say your contractor must avoid contamination by taking specific precautions during demolition, construction, and cleanup. Home owners who do the work themselves are not subject to the laws.

Why lead paint laws?

Demolition, sanding, and sawing stir up lots of dust, which can be messy and inconvenient but usually not toxic. Unfortunately, in homes constructed before 1978, renovation dust might contain lead, which is harmful when ingested or inhaled by adults and children—especially those under the age of 6.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/painting/lead-paint-laws/#ixzz2VMNz1tmS

 

 

Laws For Lead Paint | Home Lead Paint Laws | Home Safety.

Laws For Lead Paint | Home Lead Paint Laws | Home Safety

lead paint

 

If you are renovating, repairing, or painting a home constructed prior to 1978, federal lead paint laws say your contractor must avoid contamination by taking specific precautions during demolition, construction, and cleanup. Home owners who do the work themselves are not subject to the laws.

Why lead paint laws?

Demolition, sanding, and sawing stir up lots of dust, which can be messy and inconvenient but usually not toxic. Unfortunately, in homes constructed before 1978, renovation dust might contain lead, which is harmful when ingested or inhaled by adults and children—especially those under the age of 6.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/painting/lead-paint-laws/#ixzz2VMNz1tmS

 

 

Laws For Lead Paint | Home Lead Paint Laws | Home Safety.

Ken Robinson, the Man with the $16 House, Took SMU Law Students to School This Week – Dallas News – Unfair Park

Ken Robinson, the Man with the $16 House, Took SMU Law Students to School This Week – Dallas News – Unfair Park.

 

 

Ken Robinson lectures SMU law students on his first-hand experience with adverse possession.​ The property rights law of adverse possession is normally a dry topic, a chapter covered in law school to be forgotten immediately after final exams. This will not be the case for about 100 SMU law students who attended a Wednesday evening lecture by Ken Robinson, the Flower Mound man (and subject of an Observer cover story) who overtook a vacant suburban home for $16, the price of filing notice with Denton County.

Robinson is not a lawyer, but with a background in real estate and a penchant for unusual investments, he knows the law. He lectured with the charisma of a seasoned professor, first thanking everyone for having him, and even giving a hat-tip to Christopher Columbus, who used some version of adverse possession before the law even existed.

“One of these was not like the other,” he said, explaining that the home where he now lives was unkempt compared to its perfectly manicured neighbors when he noticed it in the beginning of summer. He approached the property as an investment opportunity, figuring he might get a good deal if he could contact the owner. But he couldn’t. He couldn’t even track down information about the mortgage.   Read the complete story.

ken