Tips For Kitchen Remodeling | Kitchen Remodel | Home Improvement

Tips For Kitchen Remodeling | Kitchen Remodel | Home Improvement

Home owners spend more money on kitchen remodeling than on any other home improvement project, according to the Home Improvement Research Institute. And with good reason. Kitchens are the hub of home life, and a source of pride.

A significant portion of kitchen remodeling costs may be recovered by the value the project brings to your home. Kitchen remodels in the $50,000 to $60,000 range recoup about 69% of the initial project cost at the home’s resale, according to recent data from Remodeling magazine’s Cost vs. Value Report.

A minor kitchen remodel of about $18,500 does even better, returning more than 75% of your investment.

To make sure you maximize your return, follow these seven smart kitchen remodeling strategies that will help you come up with great kitchen design ideas.

1. Establish priorities for a kitchen remodel

The National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA) recommends spending at least six months planning your kitchen remodeling project. That way, you won’t be tempted to change your mind during construction, create change orders, and inflate construction costs. Here are planning points to cover:

  • Cooking traffic patterns: A walkway through the kitchen should be at least 36 inches wide. Work aisles should be a minimum of 42 inches wide and at least 48 inches wide for households with multiple cooks.
  • Child safety: Avoid sharp, square corners on countertops, and make sure microwave ovens are installed at the proper height—3 inches below the shoulder of the primary user but not more than 54 inches from the floor.
  • Outside access: If you want easy access to entertaining areas, such as a deck or patio, factor a new exterior door into your plans.

A professional designer can simplify your kitchen remodel. Pros help make style decisions, foresee potential problems, and schedule contractors. Expect fees around $50 to $150 per hour, or 5% to 15% of the total cost of the project.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/kitchens/tips-for-kitchen-remodeling/#ixzz2Tt2rvq00

Tips For Kitchen Remodeling | Kitchen Remodel | Home Improvement.

Pantry Organization Makeovers | Vote for Your Favorite Kitchen Pantry

pantry

Throughout January, we shared four bloggers’ amazing pantry transformations. If you missed the projects or need a reminder, here’s a recap. Then, vote for your favorite and feel free to share a picture of your own cool pantry in the comments section.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/blog/kitchens/pantry-organization-makeovers/#ixzz2S2rAwHUC

Pantry Organization Makeovers | Vote for Your Favorite Kitchen Pantry.

Ugly Houses | Unusual Homes Around the World

rock house

Is beauty in the eye of the beholder? These 8 ugly houses answer that age-old question with a resounding: Yes! Despite some odd proportions, strange building materials, and off-the-wall colors, these prideful homes all have redeeming qualities that endear them to their owners. For one, they’re all unique. And in this cookie-cutter world, that’s saying a whole lot! Which is your favorite?

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/photos/home-thoughts/ugly-houses/slide/a-house-that-rocks/#ixzz2Rh3iXcsB

Ugly Houses | Unusual Homes Around the World | HouseLogic.

Updating the Map of the 25 Most Expensive Homes for Sale in San Francisco – Curbed Maps – Curbed SF

sf most expensive

 April’s had some big sales and even bigger listings, so this month’s map of the 25 most expensive homes for sale in San Francisco has quite a few new members. At $30M, the priciest abode is still former chairman of the Pacific Stock Exchange Doug Engmann’s home at 2724 Pacific St. in Pacific Heights. Absent from the list but without a reported sale is YouTube co-founder Steve Chen’s penthouse at the Ritz-Carlton, which was asking $8M. Let’s get this party started.

 

Updating the Map of the 25 Most Expensive Homes for Sale in San Francisco – Curbed Maps – Curbed SF.

Drought Resistant Plants With Vivid Color | Xeriscape Landscaping

flowers

Just when the growing season looks bleakest — think scorchers and mid-summer drought — Mom Nature brings out bursts of cheery color. These drought-resistant plants help conserve water and ensure your curb appeal won’t wilt in the heat. Native varieties are the most tolerant; check your state extension service. Meanwhile, check out our slideshow of colorful drought-resistant plants!

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/photos/gardens/drought-resistant-plants/slide/four-oclocks/#ixzz2Rgjzgdzo

Drought Resistant Plants With Vivid Color | Xeriscape Landscaping.

Plants That Don’t Need Water | Saving Water in the Garden | HouseLogic

 

Plants That Don't Need Water | Saving Water in the Garden | HouseLogic

Every plant needs water. But drought-resistant varieties need only dainty sips once they’re established, making them perfect for low-rainfall areas and low-energy gardeners.

Plants That Don’t Need Water | Saving Water in the Garden | HouseLogic.

Walk McLaughlin Eastshore State Park this weekend

 

eastshore beach

McLaughlin Eastshore State Park.

About The Park

Eastshore State Park is one of the most outstanding achievements in the history of open space protection. It is the result of decades of citizen efforts to protect San Francisco Bay as a public open space resource. Over 4,000 major stakeholders and interested parties reached substantial consensus on the future uses and improvements for the park. The newly designated State seashore is a recreational facility harmonious with its natural setting. It is located in the midst of one of the most highly urbanized areas of California.

On October 3, 2012, the California State Park and Recreation Commission renamed this 8.5-mile shoreline parkland McLaughlin Eastshore State Park in honor of Save The Bay co-founder Sylvia McLaughlin.

A photo on Flickr A photo on Flickr A photo on Flickr

Vegetable and Flower Garden | Planting Vegetables With Flowers

garden

Vegetable and Flower Garden | Planting Vegetables With Flowers.

n my garden, kale dances with cosmos, sweet potatoes mingle with marigolds, and bush beans party with coneflowers and black-eyed Susans. That’s right. Vegetables have invaded my flower garden.

The rules say flowers deserve the front yard spotlight while veggies should be hidden in the backyard. But some rules are made to be broken. That one, for example.

I started growing veggies with my front yard flowers because I had to — the backyard is too shady. Now, I’m hooked. Once you mix your edibles and ornamentals, I’m betting you’ll be hooked too.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/blog/gardens/vegetable-flower-garden/#ixzz2OlcGJYw0