Spray On Granite For Counter Tops | Counter Transformation

Updating the kitchen is probably the costliest project on most home owners’ lists. If it’s not in the budget, we hear all about the quick fixes you can do in your kitchen.

 

 

Spray On Granite For Counter Tops | Counter Transformation.

Foreclosure Activity Back on the Rise | Realtor Magazine

realtor

Foreclosure filings—which include default notices, scheduled auctions, and bank repossessions—increased 2 percent in May, rising from a 75-month low in April, according to the latest foreclosure report from RealtyTrac. Still, foreclosure filings are down 28 percent from a year ago.

The May increase was largely attributed to an 11 percent increase in bank repossessions. Foreclosure starts also ticked up 4 percent in May over last month, with 26 states posting increases, according to the report.

 

 

Foreclosure Activity Back on the Rise | Realtor Magazine.

We Offer Peace of Mind For Short Sale Sellers

short saleswww.ebpre.comwmpre.comWMPRE

Successful Short Sales Tour

 

 

jb

View my sold properties video on youtube

Jaynelle, 510.206.7144, Jaynelle.Bell at gmail.com WATERMARK PROPERTIES

 

 

How to Get Kids to Save Energy | Saving Energy at Home | HouseLogic

lights

Want your kids to pitch in and help save energy? Green parenting bloggers weigh in on getting kids to flip the switch and stop wasting energy.

 

 

How to Get Kids to Save Energy | Saving Energy at Home | HouseLogic.

Laws For Lead Paint | Home Lead Paint Laws | Home Safety

lead paint

 

If you are renovating, repairing, or painting a home constructed prior to 1978, federal lead paint laws say your contractor must avoid contamination by taking specific precautions during demolition, construction, and cleanup. Home owners who do the work themselves are not subject to the laws.

Why lead paint laws?

Demolition, sanding, and sawing stir up lots of dust, which can be messy and inconvenient but usually not toxic. Unfortunately, in homes constructed before 1978, renovation dust might contain lead, which is harmful when ingested or inhaled by adults and children—especially those under the age of 6.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/painting/lead-paint-laws/#ixzz2VMNz1tmS

 

 

Laws For Lead Paint | Home Lead Paint Laws | Home Safety.

Laws For Lead Paint | Home Lead Paint Laws | Home Safety

lead paint

 

If you are renovating, repairing, or painting a home constructed prior to 1978, federal lead paint laws say your contractor must avoid contamination by taking specific precautions during demolition, construction, and cleanup. Home owners who do the work themselves are not subject to the laws.

Why lead paint laws?

Demolition, sanding, and sawing stir up lots of dust, which can be messy and inconvenient but usually not toxic. Unfortunately, in homes constructed before 1978, renovation dust might contain lead, which is harmful when ingested or inhaled by adults and children—especially those under the age of 6.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/painting/lead-paint-laws/#ixzz2VMNz1tmS

 

 

Laws For Lead Paint | Home Lead Paint Laws | Home Safety.

DQ Custom Housing Reports Bay Area

La Jolla, CA.–The median price paid for a Bay Area home moved above the half-million-dollar mark for the first time in almost five years, pushed up by pent-up demand, an improving economy, investor activity, low mortgage interest rates and constrained supply, as well as a continued decline in distressed sales, a real estate information service reported.

The median price paid in the nine-county Bay Area rose to $510,000 in April. That was up 17.0 percent from $436,000 in March, and up 30.8 percent from $390,000 in April a year ago, according to San Diego-based DataQuick.

The 17.0 percent month-to-month increase is the highest in DataQuick’s Bay Area statistics, which go back to 1988.

“There’s somewhat of a perfect storm here, statistically speaking. The pent-up demand, the economy, interest rates, investor buying. Everything is in alignment right now, but that won’t always be the case. Also, it’s easier to regain lost ground. A major element to watch for between now and fall is how many homes are put on the market at these higher price points,” said John Walsh, DataQuick president.

The Bay Area’s median sale price first passed the $500,000 threshold in May 2004, when it rose to $501,000. It continued rising and held well above that level for four years, then dropped below $500,000 in June 2008 as home prices tumbled. From its $665,000 peak in June/July 2007 to its $290,000 trough in March 2009, the median plunged 56.4 percent, or $375,000. As of last month most of the Bay Area’s peak-to-trough loss had been regained. The median was up $220,000 from its March 2009 trough, meaning it had made up about 59 percent of its loss.

Much of the median’s ups and downs the last five years can be attributed to shifts in the types of homes sold. When the recession hit, low-cost inland foreclosures dominated, while sales in mid- to high-end markets languished. In recent months the opposite has been the case: Sales of pricier move-up homes have surged and sales of low-cost foreclosures have plummeted.

It appears a little more than half of last month’s 30.8 percent year-over-year increase in the median was price appreciation, while the rest was shifts in market mix.

A total of 7,621 new and resale houses and condos were sold in the nine-county Bay Area in April. That was up 5.2 percent from 7,243 the month before, and down 0.6 percent from 7,667 for April a year ago. Sales have fallen year-over-year for three consecutive months, mainly reflecting the constrained inventory of homes for sale.

Historically, sales have increased an average of 4.2 percent from March to April. Since 1988, when DataQuick’s statistics begin, April sales have varied from 5,636 in 1995 to 14,430 in 2004. Last month’s sales were 15.6 percent below the April average of 9,033.

The number of homes that sold in April for less than $500,000 decreased 25.7 percent year-over-year, while the number sold for more increased 24.9 percent, DataQuick reported.

Last month distressed property sales – the combination of foreclosure resales and “short sales” – made up about 24 percent of the resale market. That was down from about 27 percent in March and 44 percent a year ago.

Foreclosure resales – homes that had been foreclosed on in the prior 12 months – accounted for 8.5 percent of resales in April, down from a revised 10.2 percent in March, and down from 21.9 percent a year ago. Last month was the lowest since 8.2 percent in October 2007. Foreclosure resales peaked at 52.0 percent in February 2009. The monthly average for foreclosure resales over the past 17 years is about 10 percent.

Short sales – transactions where the sale price fell short of what was owed on the property – made up an estimated 15.0 percent of Bay Area resales last month. That was down from an estimated 16.4 percent in March and down from 22.1 percent a year earlier.

Jumbo loans, mortgages above the old conforming limit of $417,000, accounted for 48.1 percent of last month’s purchase lending, up from a revised 43.2 percent in March, and up from 35.8 percent a year ago. Last month’s jumbo share was the highest since August 2007 when it was 58.6 percent. Jumbo usage dropped as low as 17.1 percent in January 2009.

Adjustable-rate mortgages (ARMs), an important indicator of mortgage availability, accounted for 14.4 percent of the Bay Area’s home purchase loans in April. That was up from a revised 13.1 percent in March, and down from 14.9 percent in April last year. Since 2000, ARMs have accounted for 48.2 percent of all purchase loans. ARMs hit a low of 3.0 percent of loans in January 2009.

Government-insured FHA home purchase loans, a popular choice among first-time buyers, accounted for 11.0 percent of all Bay Area home purchase mortgages in April, down from 11.5 percent in March and down from 18.4 percent a year earlier. In recent months the FHA level has the been the lowest since summer 2008, reflecting both tougher qualifying standards and the difficulties first-time buyers have with competing with investors and other cash buyers.

The most active lenders to Bay Area home buyers last month were Wells Fargo with 13.8 percent of the market, RPM Mortgage with 4.3 percent, and Stearns Lending with 3.7 percent.

Last month absentee buyers – mostly investors – purchased 24.2 percent of all Bay Area homes. That was down from a revised 27.0 percent in March, and up from 23.5 percent a year ago. Absentee buyers paid a median $362,000 in April, up 31.6 percent from a year earlier.

Buyers who appear to have paid all cash – meaning no sign of a corresponding purchase loan was found in the public record – accounted for 27.8 percent of sales in April. That was down from 30.8 percent the month before and down from 28.3 percent a year earlier. The monthly average going back to 1988 is 13.0 percent. Cash buyers paid a median $365,000 in April, up 35.2 percent from a year earlier.

San Diego-based DataQuick monitors real estate activity nationwide and provides information to consumers, educational institutions, public agencies, lending institutions, title companies and industry analysts. Because of late data availability, sales were estimated in Alameda, San Francisco and San Mateo counties.

The typical monthly mortgage payment that Bay Area buyers committed themselves to paying last month was $1,821. That was up from $1,581 in March, and up from $1,492 a year ago. Adjusted for inflation, last month’s payment was 35.8 percent below the typical payment in spring 1989, the peak of the prior real estate cycle. It was 52.6 percent below the current cycle’s peak in July 2007.

Indicators of market distress continue to decline. Foreclosure activity remains high by historical standards but well below peak levels reached several years ago. Financing with multiple mortgages is low, down payment sizes are stable, DataQuick reported.

DQ Custom Reports Bay Area ReleaseD.

How to Make Fertilizer | Homemade Plant Fertilizer | HouseLogic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

yard

Your plants need food — nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium — to grow healthy and strong. But they don’t know the difference between store-bought fertilizers and the tonics you mix up yourself.

So save some money (up to $12 for 32 oz. of organic plant food) and use these low- or no-cost ingredients to make your own slow-release fertilizer. Your plants and pocketbook will thank you.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/plants-trees/how-to-make-fertilizer/#ixzz2UbQTI7Pl

 

How to Make Fertilizer | Homemade Plant Fertilizer | House

 

 

Logic.

School-home values: Top 10 places to buy in Bay Area – San Francisco Business Times

bianca torres

Location, location, location, right? Isn’t that the mantra for real estate valuation? But what if you have school-age kids? Then the real estate valuation mantra shifts: Location, location, schools.
For families with school-age kids, San Ramon ranks as the best place to buy a home based on school quality and home price, according to data from ZipRealty. Of the top 10 cities, all but two — Palo Alto and Benicia — were in the East Bay.

School-home values: Top 10 places to buy in Bay Area – San Francisco Business Times.